Freedom is a possession of inestimable value. ~Marcus Tullius Cicero

Fair Trade Resources for Conscious Consumerism

  • Posted on: 21 May 2013
  • By: Buy the change

We wanted to respond to a fantastic question we received in regards to our blog post on the Bangladesh incident and fair trade. Kelsy asked:

I just have no idea: how do you know which garments are "fair trade" and which are manufactured at a safe factory? If a sweater from Banana Republic says, "Made in Bangladesh" (or anywhere), how do I know if that particular one was made responsibly? It seems retailers get their clothing from various places, and probably are changing season to season as well. Maybe you could send a follow-up email on how/where to educate ourselves on this. With thousands of factories, it seems like it would be very difficult to know, but maybe there is an easy way? Or should we assume that none of the major retailers care about fair trade? Thanks for educating us!

As we've said before, we believe that fair trade principles ensure a good, living wage is given and that no exploitation occurs. When you make a fairly traded purchase, you are supporting farmers and artisans in the developing world and their communities. Your purchase contributes to improved healthcare, education, empowerment (especially for women), as well as minimizing negative environmental impacts of commerce.

A Few of Our Favorite Things

  • Posted on: 8 May 2013
  • By: Buy the change

Today we wanted to feature some of our favorite, one-of-a-kind, fair trade, artisan items (jewelry, accessories, health & beauty, home décor) which are all available on our website.

Conscious Consumerism – Take a Stand Against Unsafe Working Conditions

  • Posted on: 1 May 2013
  • By: Buy the change

You may have heard about the tragedy in Bangladesh where an eight-story building collapsed last Wednesday. The building housed five garment factories that make clothing for American & European consumers and contained approximately 2500 workers. In addition, there was a bank and 300 shops. The bank employees were told to leave due to the unsafe conditions, and many of the shop workers were on strike, so they were spared. However, the garment laborers were not allowed to leave. They were told to continue working and that everything was fine.

Sustainable Empowerment – Changing Women’s Lives Globally

  • Posted on: 15 April 2013
  • By: Kari hughes

Women in the Western world have very different concerns for their children than women in developing countries. For these mothers, meeting basic life needs such as feeding, clothing, and educating their children is a huge concern. This is not to say motherhood in the Western world comes without its concerns. However, there are basic support networks, social programs, and structures in place to support the less fortunate where mothers in the developing world are left to figure it all out on their own. There is one universal truth: mothers everywhere want a better life for their children. Women struggling in the developing world are faced with some very tough decisions. They are often less empowered and have fewer options due to cultural beliefs or lack of social programs for support. When we learned about the issues women and girls face around the world, we felt compelled to be a part of the solution so we founded Buy the Change.